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RN Dixie Laster is Putting Her Calling into Action at the Methodist Hospice Residence

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Dixie Laster is a nurse. She's also a healer, a listener, a wife and a daughter. But what makes Dixie extra special is her calling. It's a calling to care for the dying and to help make the last days of a person's life on earth comfortable for the patient and for the family.

"Hospice isn't a bad place when you are ready for it," she says. "I am going to make sure you enjoy the last days you have left."

That's why Dixie is anxiously waiting for the Methodist Hospice Residence to open this summer. "This will be an extension of a patient's home where we can care for the patient and the family. Caregivers get broken down, too."

Dixie says the Methodist Hospice Residence that recently opened gives patients a home environment while providing 24-hour care, pain relief and medical support. "So many patients have said 'I just wish I could go outside one more time.' At the Residence we can roll them outside in the garden or to the chapel. You can't do that in a hospital, it's not meant to do that."

"This Hospice Residence means so much to me," she says. "My family understands the power of hospice and they have given to help make this one even more special." She says that her parents have donated the children's play furniture and her husband Glenn's family has donated the communion table.

"This will make a world of difference for our community," she says.

Thanks to Dixie, to her calling and to the support of untold caregivers and donors, the Hospice Residence will be a place of service for generations to come. It's truly a family affair.

You can get a first-hand look at the Residence here, or if you'd like to support the Residence or take a tour contact Dee Flood at Dee.Flood@mlh.org.

RN Dixie Laster is Putting Her Calling into Action at the Methodist Hospice Residence

Dixie Laster is a nurse. She's also a healer, a listener, a wife and a daughter. But what makes Dixie extra special is her calling. It's a calling to care for the dying and to help make the last days of a person's life on earth comfortable for the patient and for the family.

"Hospice isn't a bad place when you are ready for it," she says. "I am going to make sure you enjoy the last days you have left."

That's why Dixie is anxiously waiting for the Methodist Hospice Residence to open this summer. "This will be an extension of a patient's home where we can care for the patient and the family. Caregivers get broken down, too."

Dixie says the Methodist Hospice Residence that recently opened gives patients a home environment while providing 24-hour care, pain relief and medical support. "So many patients have said 'I just wish I could go outside one more time.' At the Residence we can roll them outside in the garden or to the chapel. You can't do that in a hospital, it's not meant to do that."

"This Hospice Residence means so much to me," she says. "My family understands the power of hospice and they have given to help make this one even more special." She says that her parents have donated the children's play furniture and her husband Glenn's family has donated the communion table.

"This will make a world of difference for our community," she says.

Thanks to Dixie, to her calling and to the support of untold caregivers and donors, the Hospice Residence will be a place of service for generations to come. It's truly a family affair.

You can get a first-hand look at the Residence here, or if you'd like to support the Residence or take a tour contact Dee Flood at Dee.Flood@mlh.org.