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Living Organ Donors Save Lives
last updated:
Fri, 2/11/2011 9:11 AM

Have you talked to your friends and family about becoming an organ donor? If you haven't, today is the perfect time. Consider carefully the following:

  • As of January 5, 2011 there are 110,233 patients on the national transplant waiting list (UNOS).
  • There are 72,269 patients nationally that are active status on the transplant waiting list (UNOS).
  • There have been 23,953 transplants nationally from January – October 2010.
  • There have been 12,081 donors nationally from January- October 2010. (unos.org)

There is a shortage of donation as evidenced by these numbers. Talk to your family and friends today about organ donation. Sign up today by registering as an organ donor and sign to save a life at www.donatelife.com

Transplant trends are retrieved from www.unos.org and updated daily.

The leading form of treatment for many types of end-stage organ failure, organ transplantation has saved and enhanced the lives of more than 300,000 people in the United States. Increased need has led to a rise in living donor liver transplants, living donor kidney transplants and organ splitting. Living donation, transplanting all or part of an organ from a living person, has risen dramatically over the last few years. Find out more about the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, Tenn.

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Melissa Moore is a transplant coordinator for the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, Tennessee. For more information, contact the Transplant Institute at transplant@methodisthealth.org. All opinions expressed here are those of their authors and not of their employer. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. Locate a transplant surgeon in Tennessee or call 866.805.7710 for more information.

Rose Parade Honors Memphian
last updated:
Tue, 1/18/2011 1:37 PM

This year one of our own was chosen to be a part of the Rose Parade in Pasadena, CA. Arbeny Davis received a living donor kidney transplant at Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute. She and her donor have been a great inspiration to others and have educated many on living donation.

 

 

The Donate Life Rose Parade float is coordinated by OneLegacy, a nonprofit transplant donor network serving 18 million people in Southern California. Rose Parade is a registered trademark of the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association. Donate Life America is a registered trademark of Donate Life America.

Nationally recognized for its success with kidney, pancreas, kidney-pancreas and liver transplants, Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute has been a leader in the field for more than 30 years. The program offers hope to patients with conditions such as kidney failure, end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis, Hepatitis C and diabetes by treating pancreas, kidney and liver transplants in Memphis, Tenn.

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Diabetes Foot Care
last updated:
Wed, 12/08/2010 3:17 PM

When you have diabetes, proper foot care is very important. Poor foot care with diabetes can lead to serious health problems, including possibly having to remove the foot or leg (amputation).It's important to understand the connection between diabetes and foot care. As a person with diabetes, you are more vulnerable to foot problems because diabetes can damage your nerves and reduce blood flow to your feet. By taking proper care of your feet, most serious health problems associated with diabetes can be prevented.

  • Wash and Dry Your Feet Daily
  • After washing, use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking. Do not put lotion between your toes.
  • Examine Your Feet Each Day
  • Take Care of Your Toenails
  • Check the tops and bottoms of your feet. Have someone else look at your feet if you cannot see them.
  • Check for dry, cracked skin.
  • Look for blisters, cuts, scratches, or other sores.
  • Check for redness, increased warmth, or tenderness when touching any area of your feet.
  • Check for ingrown toenails, corns, and calluses.
  • If you get a blister or sore from your shoes, do not "pop" it. Apply a bandage and wear a different pair of shoes.
  • You may want a podiatrist (foot doctor) to cut your toenails.
  • If you have Medicare your doctor can prescribe diabetic shoes and Medicare will cover the cost.
  • Be careful when exercising
  • Walk and exercise in comfortable shoes.
  • Do not exercise when you have open sores on your feet.
  • Protect your feet with shoes and socks
  • Never go barefoot. Always protect your feet by wearing shoes or hard-soled slippers or footwear.

Your health care provider should examine your feet at each visit. In addition, see your health care provider if you have any of the following problems with your feet:

  • Athlete's foot
  • Sores or wounds on your feet
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Increasing numbness or pain
  • Calluses
  • Redness
  • Blackening of skin
  • Bunions
  • Infection
  • Hammer toes (when the middle joint of toes is permanently bent downward)
  • Footwear Test: make sure your shoes fit properly.

Use this simple test to see if your shoes fit correctly:

  1. Stand on a piece of paper. (Make sure you are standing and not sitting, because your foot changes shape when you stand.)
  2. Trace the outline of your foot.
  3. Trace the outline of your shoe.
  4. Compare the tracings: Is the shoe too narrow? Is your foot crammed into the shoe? The shoe should be at least 1/2 inch longer than your longest toe and as wide as your foot.

The best way to manage your diabetic feet are to keep your blood sugars monitored and your blood sugars under control. When your blood sugar is out of control you are at risk of developing diabetic ulcers and skin problems. Make sure you take care of your feet. Proper foot care is very important. Just remember that more than 60% of nontraumatic lower leg amputations occur in people with diabetes. Many times if care was taken with the proper foot care, the amputation may have been prevented.

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Dawn Caldwell is a Physical Therapist in Memphis, Tennessee with Methodist Healthcare. All opinions expressed here are those of their authors and not of their employer. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. Call 888.777.5959 for more information.

Transplant Support Group in Memphis
last updated:
Tue, 10/12/2010 2:20 PM

Join us for Methodist’s own transplant support group, Living Kindly!

This group meets the second Thursday of each month at 3:30pm located on the Thomas Wing in Methodist University Hospital on the 10th Floor in the 10 Thomas Conference Room. Pre and Post Transplant Patients, Family Members and Caregivers are welcome!

If you or a family member is interested in learning more about transplant medications, please join us at 3:00 p.m. prior to each group.

ONLY THREE DATES LEFT THIS YEAR! This is a wonderful opportunity for everyone to learn more about transplantation.

  • Oct 14
  • Nov 11
  • Dec 9

Food and beverages are served and parking is free. Find out more about our transplant support group in Memphis, Tenn.

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Melissa Moore is a transplant coordinator for the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, Tennessee. For more information, contact the Transplant Institute at transplant@methodisthealth.org. All opinions expressed here are those of their authors and not of their employer. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. Locate a transplant surgeon in Tennessee or call 866.805.7710 for more information.

A Guide to Living Donation
last updated:
Wed, 9/22/2010 11:03 AM

Did you know there are multiple advantages to living organ donation? Transplant patients have a higher success rate after transplantation. They spend less time on the waiting list and are better prepared for transplant surgery since the timing can be planned. Patients have a better quality of life and better organ compatibility especially with blood related donors.

Here are some of the most common questions about living organ donation:

Who Can Be a Living Donor?

Friend
Family
Emotionally Related Friend

What Do You Do To Become A Living Donor?

Contact the Transplant Center at 901.516.8466 to begin a screening questionnaire

Who Pays For the Donor Testing?

Typically the recipient’s insurance will pay for the testing. This will be verified by one of our Financial Case Manager’s per case.

Who Pays For the Donor Surgery?

Typically the recipient’s insurance will pay for the operation and follow up in the post transplant clinic. This will be verified by one of the Financial Case Manager’s per case.

What Testing Will I Need To Complete My Evaluation?

  • We will begin with blood typing and crossmatching blood from donor and recipient
  • Other labs will include chemistries, complete blood count, clotting factors, 24 hour urine to assess kidney function, urinalysis, viral studies, other labs as needed
  • Procedural testing will include chest x-ray, CT scan, GFR (kidney function test), cardiac testing as indicated
  • Outside referrals or additional testing will be made as indicated

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Melissa Moore is a transplant coordinator for the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, Tennessee. For more information, contact the Transplant Institute at transplant@methodisthealth.org. All opinions expressed here are those of their authors and not of their employer. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. Locate a transplant surgeon in Tennessee or call 866.805.7710 for more information.

Remember your Transplant Medications
last updated:
Thu, 9/02/2010 2:09 PM

Ask any transplant patient and they will most likely tell you the most important thing they do to protect their transplanted organ is take their medications. These medications are so very vital. The medications that a transplant patient takes range from anti-rejection medications, to anti-virals and antibiotics to prevent opportunistic infections, to different vitamins and minerals that may be lost after transplant. All of the medications work together to keep the transplant patient healthy. However, it is not always easy to remember to take all these different pills. Here are a few tips for all patients to help remember to take the transplant medications on schedule:

  1. Take your pills at the same time as an activity you do everyday, such as brushing your teeth, or taking a shower. After a week or two of doing this, you will begin to associate taking your meds as a part of the activity and it should become a habit.
  2. Set an alarm as a reminder. Most of us carry our cell phones everywhere these days. You can set a daily alarm as your “pill alarm.” The only caveat to this is remembering to bring your pills with you if the alarm is set for the middle of the day. These alarms can also be set as a start up reminder on your computer for all those who are more tech-savvy.
  3. Place reminder cards in various locations. If you take your pills at work, place a reminder on the computer, if you’re at home place a sticker on the refrigerator or on the bathroom mirror. Just make sure the reminders are somewhere you will look every day.
  4. Ask a responsible and willing family member, friend or co-worker to support you with daily reminders. This can be especially helpful if the friend or family member also takes daily medications. You can make a pact to remind each other about taking your meds.
  5. Use a pillbox. This way you can easily look and see if you have missed a dose. Pillboxes eliminate second-guessing and are easily purchased at any drug store.
  6. Keep a chart or calendar. Once you take your medications for the day, place a check on the calendar. If you take multiple doses, divide the calendar squares into as many pieces as necessary to place the checks. This can be especially helpful if you have a pocket calendar, which can go with you everywhere.

These are just some small tips, which may help you remember to take your incredibly important transplant medications. There are many other ways to remember you just have to find what works for you. Once you get into the routine, it should easily become a lifelong habit that you never have to think twice about.

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Amanda Dean is a Nurse Practitioner at the Pre-Transplant Clinic. For more information, contact the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, Tennessee at transplant@methodisthealth.org. All opinions expressed here are those of their authors and not of their employer. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. Locate a transplant surgeon in Tennessee or call 866.805.7710.

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Methodist Healthcare is an integrated health care delivery system, dedicated to the art of healing through our faith-based commitment to minister to the whole person. 1211 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38104 • (901) 516-7000

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