Heart Attack

Published On 07/11/2011

Acute Myocardial Infarction, also known as a heart attack, occurs when there is a blockage in a vessel that supplies blood to the heart muscle. When these vessels are blocked, it causes heart muscle to die and not function properly.

Quality Report Findings for January 2013 - December 2013
 Within Top 10%        Above National Average        Below National Average
Hospital Quality Measures Methodist Healthcare University South North Germantown Top 10% Nationally Statewide average Nationwide average
AMI Appropriate Care Score 99.5% 100.0% 100.0% 99.5% 99.3% 100.0% No data available No data available
Aspirin at arrival


99.7%


100.0%


98.8%


99.5%

100.0%

100.0%

97.0%

97.0%
Aspirin at discharge
100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

98.0%

98.0%
ACEI or ARB for LVSD
100.0%

100.0%
100.0%
100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

97.0%

97.0%
Beta blocker at discharge
99.9%

100.0%


98.7%


100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

99.0%

99.0%
Thrombolytic agent received within 30 mins of arrival N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 100.0% 90.0% 58.0%
PCI received within 90 minutes of Hospital arrival
98.9%

100.0%
100.0%
100.0%

93.8%

100.0%

96.0%

94.0%

N/A indicates there are no patients to report or too few patients to report for this indicator.
Methodist Fayette Hospital had no patients to report or too few patients to report for this indicator. 

What These Indicators Mean & Why It's Important to You

Aspirin at arrival– Patients with a heart attack should receive an aspirin prior to or after arrival at the hospital. Studies show early use of aspirin decreases complications and death. 

Aspirin at discharge – Patients with a heart attack should be instructed to take aspirin after discharge from the hospital. Studies show that long-term aspirin therapy in patients who have had a heart attack reduces the risk of complications and death by as much as 20%.

ACEI or ARB for LVSD – Patients with a heart attack who also have decreased heart function should receive an ACEI or ARB after discharge from the hospital. These medications help reduce your blood pressure and pressure in your heart by regulating the hormone that causes narrowing of the blood vessels. Studies show that ACEI or ARB medications help reduce complications and death in patients with decreased heart function.

Beta Blocker at discharge – Patients with a heart attack should be prescribed a beta blocker after discharge from the hospital. Beta blockers help relieve stress on the heart by reducing the heart rate and reducing the force needed to make the heart pump. Studies show that long-term use of beta blockers helps to reduce the complications and risk of death by as much as 20%.

Thrombolytics within 30 minutes of arrival – Patients with a heart attack may receive a thrombolytic. Thrombolytics are medications that dissolve or break up blood clots. The decision to use this type of medication is based on how severe your heart attack is and your medical history. If thrombolytics are used, they should be given within 30 minutes of your arrival at the hospital.

PCI within 90 minutes of arrival – Patients with a heart attack may need a procedure to re-establish blood flow to the heart. This procedure is called a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) and should be done within 90 minutes of arrival to the hospital. PCI may include one or more of the following procedures:

  • Angioplasty – A balloon is threaded into the blocked blood vessel and inflated to open the blockage.
  • Coronary Stent - A stent (a small wire tube) is inserted into the blocked blood vessel and expanded to “bridge” the blockage open. 
  • Atherectomy- A blade or laser is used to cut through the blocked blood vessel and remove the plaque build up along with the clot.


How We Measure

We have a team of associates that review patient information for our hospitals. Our team attends clinics so they will be up to date on the most current rules. Our information is entered into a computerized system that checks the information for completeness and accuracy. Each missed opportunity is reviewed by our Clinical Decision Support department and all corrections are made before the data is submitted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) or The Joint Commission.

Working to Ensure the Best Patient Care

We regularly communicate with the caregivers you see throughout the hospital about the best practices and evidence-based care that we are measuring behind the scenes. We review the care of our patients during their hospital stay, and we conduct reviews to identify opportunities for improvement. We use this information to develop processes that provide our patients with safe, reliable, consistent, high-quality care.